Tips For Hosting A Clean Your Block Party

With Clean Your Block Party rapidly approaching on Saturday, we thought it would be good to share a few ideas to help with planning. This event promises to be a great experience for everyone to help and develop pride in their community. So here are a few things you will need and some stuff you may want to add.

20809715322_c8d7130d80_k
People: Obviously you are going to need people, but you also need motivated leaders to keep everyone going. As the day warms up and people get dirty you are going to need leaders to keep people excited about what they are doing. It is also important that everyone has a clear vision of what projects you are working on. That way teams can divide up and more effectively tackle all the aspects.

Plan: You have your neighbors organized and ready to seize the day. Now you need an idea of what everyone wants to accomplish. Without out a plan, people will just go out and try to find something to do, but this is not the most economical way to spend the day. Without direction, it is easy for some volunteers to become disillusioned with the project and decide to call it a day. Everyone likes checking things off a list so maybe have a whiteboard where people can cross off tasks. This also allows everyone to see how much they have improved the neighborhood.

22126976380_254127a1f2_k
Safety: The great thing about events like this is that it brings people of all ages and abilities together. So it’s important to remember that some people manage heat and physical exertion differently. Make sure to have cold water on hand, encourage people to take breaks, and keep drinking water. It’s easy to forget to take care of yourself when you are working with an enthusiastic group. Also, make sure people are taking proper precautions. As you pick things up you can come into contact with hazardous materials, sharp objects, or wildlife. Make sure people are wearing gloves, appropriate attire, and footwear. Work together and continue to check on each other to make sure everyone has a safe experience.

Recognition: When it’s over, make sure you recognize everyone’s contributions. When people feel appreciated they take pride in what they do. This may help keep people motivated to continue maintaining an orderly neighborhood. Once people are invested you will likely see a lot less garbage to clean up next year so you can focus on new projects.

21709691874_acd4645388_k
Optional After Party: A great way to continue the community building is to have a potluck cookout after you all are finished. Everyone can go home to wash up, then return to a designated spot where you can continue to get to know your neighbors and celebrate all that you have achieved.

We hope that everyone has a wonderful day and are excited to see how you beautified Durham. During and after the event please share your hard work on Social media and be sure to tag us in it. Here are some ideas you can use for inspiration:

During:
Twitter:

We care about your neighborhood because we are a community. That’s why we cleaned our block! @DurhamBeautiful #cleanYOURblock #Durham

Instagram:

Our neighborhood is building community while cleaning up the block. This is how we celebrate where we live here in [Insert Community Name]. @KeepDurhamBeatuiful #cleanYOURblock #Durham #NorthCarolina #[InstertCommunityName]Neighborhood.

After:
Twitter:

We had a great time cleaning up our community. This block is now clean! Thank you to all the volunteers. @DurhamBeautiful #cleanYOURblock

Instagram:

Look at how much better our block looks! This is how the community in [Insert Neighborhood Name] does it. Thank you to everyone who came out and helped. @KeepDurhamBeatiful #cleanYOURblock #Durham #NorthCarolina #[InsertCommunityName]Neighborhood

Durham Hosts E-Waste Recycling & Paper Shredding Event Jan 16

Share!  #Durham hosts free E-Waste Recycling, Paper Shredding & Tree Disposal Event Jan. 16 http://bit.ly/1QFkpXj

Live Christmas Trees Will Be Accepted at Free and Convenient Event; Open to All Durham Residents and Businesses

DURHAM, N.C. – Durham residents and businesses looking for an easy and free way to recycle electronic waste, shred confidential documents, and dispose of live Christmas trees should attend the City of Durham E-Waste Recycling & Paper Shredding Event next month.

The event will be on Saturday, January 16, 2016, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the visitor side of the Durham County Memorial Stadium<http://dconc.gov/residents/county-stadium>, located at 750 Stadium Dr. Event staff will be on hand to unload old electronics, paper, and Christmas trees. Hard plastic toys as well as plastic and metal lawn furniture may also be dropped off for recycling.

The event, sponsored by the City of Durham Solid Waste Management Department<http://durhamnc.gov/832/Solid-Waste-Management>, Sonoco Recycling<http://www.sonocorecycling.com/>, Shimar Recycling<http://www.shimar.com/>, Synergy Recycling<http://www.synergyrecycling.com/>, and Durham County Government<http://dconc.gov/>, will accept nearly all electronic devices with a cord, including:

  • *         Computers, laptops, keyboards, mice, printers, monitors, speakers, copiers, scanners, circuit boards, hard drives, computer parts, etc.
  • *         Televisions, stereo equipment, tape players, receivers, amplifiers, record players, etc.
  • *         Kitchen electronics, such as microwaves, mixers, blenders, choppers, etc.
  • *         Telephones, cell phones, and fax machines
  • *         Hair dryers, curling irons, alarm clocks, and vacuum cleaners
  • *         Power tools, cordless tools, etc.
  • *         Electronic toys, such as keyboards and video game systems
  • *         This event will not accept large appliances, refrigerators, air conditioners, or any other appliances that contain Freon.

Confidential paper shredding will also be provided on site. Requirements for shredding include:

  • *         Paper may contain paper clips and staples; however, hanging file folders will not be accepted.
  • *         Only paper should be brought for shredding. CDs, DVDs, and other non-paper items will not be accepted.
  • *         All paper should be loose and not in binders or other binding items made of non-paper.
  • *         Residents may be present to observe their confidential document shredding if the amount to be shredded can fit into one 96-gallon roll cart (approximately 240 pounds of material or approximately eight small, banker boxes of material).
  • *         Participants with larger quantities will have items placed in boxes to be shredded off-site at Shimar Recycling’s secure facility.

The Solid Waste Management Department<http://durhamnc.gov/832/Solid-Waste-Management> will collect live Christmas trees from all solid waste customers from December 28 until February 6. Trees should be placed at the curb by 7 a.m. on residents’ normal household garbage collection day. Residents are asked to leave the tree at the curb for one week before contacting Durham One Call<http://durhamnc.gov/1439/Durham-One-Call> at (919) 560-1200 to report a missed tree collection. Live Christmas trees can also be dropped off for disposal during this event. Requirements for live Christmas tree disposal include:

  • *         Trees taller than six feet should be cut in half.
  • *         Remove all decorations and hardware, including tinsel, lights, garland, ornaments, nails, and stands.
  • *         Do not place trees in bags.

Residents who can’t make this event can still safely and conveniently recycle their old electronics at the City’s Waste Disposal and Recycling Center<http://durhamnc.gov/878/Waste-Disposal-Recycling-Center>, located at 2115 E. Club Blvd. The facility is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to noon. Live Christmas trees will also be accepted at the facility at no charge until February 6. Trees delivered after February 6 will be subject to the usual disposal fees. For information about items accepted at this event or the City’s recycling facilities, contact Durham One Call<http://durhamnc.gov/1439/Durham-One-Call> at (919) 560-1200 or visit the City’s Solid Waste Management Department Web page<http://durhamnc.gov/832/Solid-Waste-Management>.

About the City of Durham Solid Waste Management Department The Solid Waste Management Department<http://durhamnc.gov/832/Solid-Waste-Management> promotes and supports a high quality of life for the residents of Durham by providing comprehensive, responsive, environmentally-safe, efficient, and cost-effective solid waste collection, recycling, and disposal programs. Department services include roll-out cart collection, cart delivery and repair service, cardboard collection, yard waste collection, waste reduction and recycling, bulky item pick-up, and disposal services. The departmental supports the City’s Strategic Plan<http://durhamnc.gov/183/Strategic-Plan> by providing professional management that contributes to creating thriving, livable neighborhoods as well as an innovative and high-performing organization.

Volunteers Needed for Historic Geer Cemetery Cleanup on Saturday October 17th

Keep Durham Beautiful teams with Friends of Geer Cemetery to lead volunteers in beautification project

What: Volunteer Cleanup at Historic Geer Cemetery – Volunteers will collect litter and tree debris, remove vines, and protect the grave markers.

When: Saturday, October 17, 2015 from 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Where: 800 Colonial Avenue, Durham, NC

Why: Geer Cemetery is a four-acre wooded Cemetery in East Durham and the resting place of many of the earliest generations of African Americans in Durham. No group claims ownership of the historic Durham cemetery which remains largely unmaintained and will benefit from the care that these volunteers will provide. Friends of Geer Cemetery formed in order to reveal its significant history and help advocate for this beautiful, rustic and historic public space in Durham. This year marks the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the 13th constitutional amendment abolishing slavery and an observance is planned later in the year at Geer Cemetery.

Who: The general public is invited to join Keep Durham Beautiful, Friends of Geer Cemetery, City of Durham General Services, and University of Tennessee-Knoxville student volunteers to help beautify the cemetery. Gloves, tools and water will be provided by Keep Durham Beautiful. The City of Durham Department of General Services will assist with debris removal.

Fast Facts:

  • Ron Bartholomew and Wayne Tabron of Durham Marble Works will present a short workshop at the cemetery on resetting and cleaning grave marker stones from 12:30-1:00 pm before the cleanup.
  • The Friends of Geer Cemetery plans to observe the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the 13th constitutional amendment abolishing slavery on December 4, 5 and 6 with the following events in Durham:
    • December 4: Wreath-laying ceremony at Geer Cemetery
    • December 5: Libation ceremony at Stagville State Historic Site
    • December 6: Honorable Judge Allyson K. Duncan, U.S. Circuit Court Judge 4th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals will be the Keynote Speaker at the Friends of Geer Cemetery commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the US Constitution at White Rock Baptist Church.
  • Friends of Geer Cemetery is a volunteer group meeting monthly to advocate for Geer Cemetery. Its mission is to honor those who lie at rest in the Cemetery, and to preserve Geer Cemetery for posterity.
  • For more information about Saturday’s cleanup or other volunteer projects contact Keep Durham Beautiful at (919) 672-6682 or tania@keepdurhambeautiful.org.

About Keep Durham Beautiful Keep Durham Beautiful is a nonprofit, volunteer organization working in partnership with the City of Durham General Services Department and Durham County to encourage residents, businesses, and community organizations to protect the environment and enhance the appearance of Durham through cleanup events, beautification projects, waste reduction, and educational activities. To learn more, visit the website, like on Facebook, and follow on Instagram, flickr, and Twitter.

Durham Encourages Residents to Help Prevent Cankerworm Tree Damage

 

Trees Across Durham Offering Free Workshops and Tree-Banding Materials

Share! #Durham offers free workshops & tree-banding materials to help prevent cankerworm damage http://bit.ly/1N1pq8a

DURHAM, N.C. – Residents interesting in preventing the damaging effects of cankerworms on Durham’s trees should volunteer now to take action to protect their own trees and others in the community.

Trees Across Durham, a broad-based partnership dedicated to making Durham a healthier and greener community by planting and protecting trees, is offering free workshops and free tree-banding materials as part of the new “Band Together” Campaign to help residents tackle cankerworms, which have reached outbreak levels in Durham over the last few years.

According to Urban Forestry Manager Alex Johnson with the City of Durham General Services Department, cankerworms are more than just a nuisance. “Cankerworms deplete a tree’s ability to respond to stress by stripping them of their early spring leaves, which forces them to re-grow their canopies from stored reserves before they can begin to generate the nutrients they need to grow and defend themselves,” Johnson said. “Cankerworms are also a nuisance, descending from tree canopies onto cars, houses, lawns, sidewalks, and people. They are indiscriminate feeders upon all plants while they make their way from their hatching sites in the trees to the ground where they pupate.” 

One of the most effective ways to reduce cankerworm populations and save trees is through tree banding. The banding process includes wrapping trees with a sticky barrier, which blocks the flightless female moths from crawling to the tops of trees and laying eggs. This successful technique stops the cankerworms from reproducing which reduces their populations and their damaging effects when a majority of trees in an area are properly banded.

Workshops planned in the coming weeks will teach residents how to properly band their own trees, and volunteer days are set to target several neighborhoods for tree band installations. Residents are encouraged to register for the workshops and volunteer banding days to get updates on locations or rescheduling.

 Workshops:

Volunteer Banding Days:         

  • Thursday, October 15, 2 p.m. – Walltown, meet at the intersection of Green and Berkeley streets
  • Thursday, December 3, 1 p.m. – Old North Durham, meet at Bay-Hargrove Park, 208 Hargrove St.
  • Tuesday, December 8, 1 p.m. – Walltown, meet at the intersection of Green and Berkeley streets

Residents who plan to install tree bands on their own trees should do so by Halloween, and then apply the special glue by the first hard freeze (usually around Thanksgiving). Bands should be removed by May 1 to prevent rot during the hot, humid months.For the second year in a row, the Durham County Main Library, located at 300 N. Roxboro St., will have free tree-banding kits available for checkout by October 16 until the end of December. Kits include materials and tools to band approximately two medium-sized trees. Durham County received the National Association of Counties Achievement Award for offering this innovative banding kit check-out program last year.The “Band Together” Campaign is a partnership between Trees Across Durham, City of Durham, Durham County, Keep Durham Beautiful, and other community organizations to encourage residents to take steps now to reduce cankerworms. For more information about cankerworms, including a video which explains how to band a tree, as well as workshops and volunteer days, visit Trees Across Durham, email, or call (919) 560-7993.  

Durham Hosts E-Waste Recycling & Paper Shredding Event

Free and Convenient Event Open to All Durham Residents and Businesses

DURHAM, N.C. – Durham residents and businesses looking for an easy and free way to recycle electronic waste and shred confidential documents should attend the City of Durham’s E-Waste Recycling & Paper Shredding Event next month.

The event will be on Saturday, October 10, 2015, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the visitor side of the Durham County Memorial Stadium, located at 750 Stadium Dr. Event staff will be on hand to unload old electronics and paper. Hard plastic toys as well as plastic and metal lawn furniture may also be dropped off for recycling.

The event, sponsored by the City of Durham Solid Waste Management Department, Sonoco Recycling, Shimar Recycling, Synergy Recycling, and Durham County Government, will accept nearly all electronic devices with a cord, including:

  • Computers, laptops, keyboards, mice, printers, monitors, speakers, copiers, scanners, circuit boards, hard drives, computer parts, etc.
  • Televisions, stereo equipment, tape players, receivers, amplifiers, record players, etc.
  • Kitchen electronics, such as microwaves, mixers, blenders, choppers, etc.
  • Telephones, cell phones, and fax machines
  • Hair dryers, curling irons, alarm clocks, and vacuum cleaners
  • Power tools, cordless tools, etc.
  • Electronic toys, such as keyboards and video game systems
  • This event will not accept large appliances, refrigerators, air conditioners, or any other appliances that contain Freon. Confidential paper shredding will also be provided on site. Requirements for shredding include:
  • Paper may contain paper clips and staples; however, hanging file folders will not be accepted. 
  • Only paper should be brought for shredding. CDs, DVDs, and other non-paper items will not be accepted. 
  • All paper should be loose and not in binders or other binding items made of non-paper.
  • Residents may be present to observe their confidential document shredding if the amount to be shredded can fit into one 96-gallon roll cart (approximately 240 pounds of material or approximately eight small, banker boxes of material).
  • Participants with larger quantities will have items placed in boxes to be shredded off-site at Shimar Recycling’s secure facility. 

Residents who can’t make this event can still safely and conveniently recycle their old electronics at the City’s Waste Disposal and Recycling Center, located at 2115 E. Club Blvd. The facility is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to noon. For information about items accepted at this event or the City’s recycling facilities, contact Durham One Call at (919) 560-1200 or visit the City’s Solid Waste Management Department Web page

Durham Joins National Water Conservation Challenge

Residents Encouraged to Take the Pledge During April

DURHAM, N.C. — During the month of April, you can save water, save money, earn prizes and help Durham win the National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation.

Mayor William V. “Bill” Bell and the City’s Water Management Department are encouraging residents to visit http://www.MyWaterPledge.com to sign up for the Wyland Foundation’s Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation.

The challenge, in its fourth year, is a competition between cities across the United States to see who can be the most water-wise. Mayors and civic leaders are challenging their residents to conserve water, energy and other natural resources on behalf of their city. Last year, Durham finished in fifth place, and Mayor Bell hopes to beat that ranking this year. “As Durham continues to grow, our water resources will be stretched to meet increases in demand,” Bell said. “By participating in the National Mayor’s Challenge for Water Conservation, residents can pledge to make Durham a more sustainable community both now and in the future.”

Cities with the highest percentage of participants are entered for a chance to win hundreds of environmentally friendly prizes, including a Toyota Prius Plug-In, water-saving fixtures and gift certificates. Residents can also visit http://www.DurhamSavesWater.org for more information and ideas for saving water.

Connect with the Creek Festival – Saturday March 21 2-5pm

Creek Week kickoff event featuring loads of info on local water resources and groups, parade with Bulltown Strutters and Northeast Creek Streamwatch costumes and puppets, creek art from local schools, painted rain cisterns for auction, a scavenger hunt, Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association painted creek, Frog Hollow Outdoors class raffle, and Pie Pushers and Dusty Donuts food trucks! Durham Central Park at 501 Foster Street in Durham, NC.

To see all Creek Week Events, visit www.durhamcreekweek.org.

To join the event on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/events/1628065500756568/?ref=6&ref_notif_type=plan_user_invited

Durham’s 2015 Arbor Day at Old West Durham- Sunday March 15, 2015

Celebrating 32 years of recognition as a Tree City USA!

What:              City of Durham 2015 Arbor Day Celebration with Community Tree Planting

Who:               City of Durham General Services Department Urban Forestry Division, Keep Durham Beautiful, Inc., and Trees Across Durham

When:             Sunday, March 15, 2015 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where:           Old West Durham Neighborhood Streets and West Main Street – Meet at Greystone Baptist Church Parking Lot, 2601 Hillsborough Road, Durham

Fast Facts:

  • Old West Durham has historically benefitted from a robust tree canopy, but many trees are nearing the end of their lives and the canopy is declining. City staff and neighbors have identified numerous locations suitable for tree planting. Involving the community in planting and caring for the trees is an important component to restore and protect the trees in this urban landscape.
  • This annual celebration of Durham’s trees is free and open to the public. Activities are suitable for all ages and tools are provided for participants. Activities for volunteers include:
  • Community tree planting of 100 trees along the neighborhood streets of Old West Durham. Trees are provided by the City’s General Services Department Urban Forestry Division, Old West Durham Neighborhood Association, and Keep Durham Beautiful.
  • Tree seedling giveaway and educational table displays, where attendees can choose from 11 varieties of seedlings and receive guidance on tree selection and planting from Durham County Master Gardener volunteers. Tree seedlings, along with information about the benefits of trees and tree care, are provided courtesy of the Durham City-County Sustainability Office and Keep Durham Beautiful.
  • For additional information, or to volunteer for this community tree planting event, email info@keepdurhambeautiful.org or call (919) 354-2729 or 919-672-6682.

Durham E-Waste Recycling & Shredding Event January 17

Free & Convenient Event Open to All Durham Residents & Businesses

Durham residents and businesses waiting for the next free opportunity to recycle electronic waste, shred confidential documents, and safely dispose of their Christmas trees should plan to attend the E-Waste Recycling and Paper Shredding Event next month.

The event will be held Saturday, January 17, 2015, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the visitor side of the Durham County Memorial Stadium, 750 Stadium Dr., Durham. Event staff will be on hand to unload old electronics and paper.

The event, co-sponsored by the City of Durham’s Solid Waste Management Department, Sonoco Recycling, Shred Ace, Synergy Recycling and Durham County Government, will accept nearly all electronic devices with a cord, including: •  Computers, laptops, keyboards, mice, printers, monitors, speakers, copiers, scanners, circuit boards, hard drives, computer parts, etc. •  Televisions, stereo equipment, tape players, receivers, amplifiers, record players, etc. •  Kitchen electronics, such as microwaves, mixers, blenders, choppers, etc. •  Telephones, cell phones, and fax machines •  Hair dryers, curling irons, alarm clocks and vacuum cleaner •  Power tools, cordless tools, etc. •  Electronic toys, such as keyboards and video game systems •  This event will not accept large appliances, refrigerators, air conditioners, or any other appliances that contain Freon

Confidential paper shredding will also be provided on site. Requirements for shredding include: •  Paper may contain paper clips and staples; however, hanging file folders will not be accepted. •  Only paper should be brought for shredding; CDs, DVDs, and other non-paper items will not be accepted.  •  All paper should be loose and not in binders or other binding items made of non-paper. •  Residents may be present to observe their confidential document shredding if the amount to be shredded can fit into one 96-gallon roll cart (approximately 240 pounds or approximately eight small, banker boxes of material). •  Participants with larger quantities will have items placed in boxes to be shredded off-site at a secure facility.

Christmas trees will also be accepted at this event. Trees taller than six feet should be cut in half and not placed in bags. Residents should also remove all decorations and hardware, including tinsel, lights, garland, ornaments, nails, and stands.

Durham residents who can’t make this event can still safely and conveniently recycle their old electronics at the City’s Waste Disposal and Recycling Center (Transfer Station), 2115 E. Club Blvd. The facility is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. to noon.

For information about items accepted at this event or the City’s recycling facilities, contact Durham One Call at (919) 560-1200 or visit http://DurhamNC.gov/ich/op/swmd/Pages/wr_transfer.aspx.

Want to help the water? Trees, yes. Leaves, no.

Fall is an ideal time to plant trees. Roots that have three seasons to establish before the hot, dry summer give seedlings a promising start.

Trees filter water runoff before it enters the stormwater drainage system. This prevents dirt, nutrients, and bacteria from washing into streams and lakes. Trees also reduce the amount of runoff rushing to creeks in a rain storm.

Trees add value to your property and provide shade, beauty, cleaner air, and wildlife habitat. They can protect your yard from erosion when planted along creek banks. Together with native bushes and grasses, trees act as buffers between pollution sources and waterways.

If trees are so good, why are leaves bad for the water? As leaves decay, nutrients that feed algae enter the water. This reduces oxygen in streams and lakes and can lead to fish kills and bad tasting drinking water.

Streams will always have natural sources of falling leaves. But when too many people sweep or blow yard leaves onto streets, the extra leaves in the drainage system cause a problem.

Doing your part:

  • www.TreesAcrossDurham.org lists trainings and projects to help keep Durham shady.
  • Keep it neat; no leaves on the street. Compost them or use your yard waste bin.
  • Report illegal leaf dumping: (919) 560-SWIM.
  • Plant trees, bushes, and grasses near stream banks.