Durham Launches Bull City Workplace Challenge

Workplaces Can Now Save Money, Earn Local Recognition & Help the Environment

Share! #Durham workplaces can now save money, help our environment & more through the #BullCityWorkplaceChallenge: www.BullCityWorkplaceChallenge.com


DURHAM, N.C. – Workplaces interested in saving money, helping Durham’s environment, and earning local recognition can now register to join the new Bull City Workplace Challenge.

City of Durham Mayor William V. “Bill” Bell and Durham County Board of Commissioners Chair Wendy Jacobs are challenging workplaces across Durham to take new strides toward a greener, more sustainable future by joining this new program.

Created by the Durham City-County Sustainability Office along with 10 City and County departments and community partners, the challenge is designed to help workplaces of all types save energy, conserve water, protect water quality, produce less waste, and support sustainable transportation. The program will publicly recognize workplaces that substantially address these sustainability goals. Any workplace located within Durham County can participate.

Workplaces can now register on the Bull City Challenge website and complete an initial scorecard to assess their current green practices. Participants then improve their score by pursuing the remaining actions on the scorecard. These scorecard actions range in difficulty, cost, and time involved. To help workplaces improve their scores, the challenge offers guiding resources, experts who can answer questions, and lunch-n-learns throughout the year.

As workplaces complete new scorecard actions throughout the year, they will document their progress by updating their scorecard to achieve Bronze, Silver, or Gold recognition and will be publicly recognized in Spring 2018.

“Over time, many of the same steps to save energy and water and reduce waste will save organizations money,” said Durham City-County Sustainability Manager Tobin Freid. “A lot of people who live and work in Durham value the environment and support sustainable action. The challenge will help Durhamites bring these values into their workplaces.”

Workplaces that join the challenge will take practical steps that include the following:

  • Protect the health of their employees, their customers, and the public by reducing air and water pollution and workplace use of toxic chemicals.
  • Lessen the impact of climate change by emitting fewer greenhouse gases.
  • Protect communities by reducing and diverting waste from landfills.
  • Conserve natural resources such as water supplies.

According to Freid, for workplaces that are just starting off with green plans, the challenge is a great way to prioritize specific, manageable, and practical steps to take. Workplaces that have already taken steps on sustainability will be able to track their progress and find even more ways to become more sustainable.

Participants in the Bull City Workplace Challenge will help Durham reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent from residences, businesses, and institutions by 2030 as required in the 2007 Durham City-County Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Plan as well as part of the City’s and County’s strategic plans. For more information, visit the Bull City Challenge website or call (919) 560-7999.

About the Durham City-County Sustainability Office

The mission of the Durham City/County Sustainability Office is to help protect and improve Durham’s environment through wise use of natural resources by providing guidance and resources to City and County employees, businesses, and citizens. For more information, visit the website, like on Facebook, and follow on Twitter.

 

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10 Reasons to Be Thankful for Trees

thankful-tree-giveaway-2016Durham residents are encouraged to register for a free tree as part of the Give Thanks: 2016 Keep Durham Beautiful Tree Giveaway and Food Drive

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, it’s not too early to start reflecting on things we are thankful for. From providing the clean air and oxygen we appreciate during our outdoor fall activities to producing apples for that delicious apple crisp our neighbor makes– trees should be added to your list of things to give thanks for this November. While there are many reasons to be thankful for trees, here our 10 of our favorite motivations for planting, caring for, and protecting Durham’s trees:

10 Reasons to Be Thankful for Trees:

  1. Trees reduce violence: Studies have shown that barren neighborhoods and homes have a greater incidence of violence than their greener counterparts. Trees and landscaping help to reduce the level of fear.
  2. Trees conserve energy: Three trees placed strategically around a single-family home can cut air conditioning needs by up to 50 percent. Reducing the energy demand for cooling saves money and reducescarbon dioxide and other pollution emissions.
  3. Trees cool the streets and the city: Trees cool a city by up to 10°F, by shading our homes and streets, breaking up urban “heat islands” and releasing water vapor into the air through their leaves.Trees bring diverse groups of people together: Tree plantings provide an opportunity for community involvement and empowerment that improves the quality of life in our neighborhoods. All cultures, ages, and genders have an important role to play at a tree planting or tree care event.
  4. Trees provide oxygen: In one year an acre of mature trees can provide enough oxygen for 18 people.
  5. Trees provide economic benefits: The beauty of a well-planted property and its surrounding neighborhood can raise property values by as much as 15 percent. Similar benefits are seen in business districts; studies show that the more trees and landscaping a business district has, the more business will flow in.
  6. Trees combat the greenhouse effect: Trees absorb CO2, a major greenhouse gas, removing and storing the carbon while releasing the oxygen back into the air. In one year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the amount of CO2 produced when you drive your car 26,000 miles.
  7. Trees clean the air: Trees absorb odors and pollutant gases (nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and filter particulates out of the air by trapping them on their leaves and bark.
  8. Trees help prevent soil erosion and water pollution: Trees reduce and slow runoff, holding soil in place and helping filter water naturally.
  9. Trees provide food: An apple tree can yield up to 15-20 bushels of fruit per year and can be planted on a small urban lot. Aside from fruit for humans, trees provide food and habitat for birds and wildlife.

Help spread the love for trees:

Help spread the love for trees by joining us for our Give Thanks: 2016 Keep Durham Beautiful Tree Giveaway. Thanks to a generous donation from Alliance for Community Trees, Keep Durham Beautiful will be handing out 300 trees for Durham City and County residents this fall. To learn more about the tree species available and giveaway pre-registration, visit: www.keepdurhambeautiful.org/treegiveaway2016

Antique Road Extravaganza to Benefit Keep Durham Beautiful

KDB supporters encouraged to bring in their heirlooms and keepsakes for professional appraisal at the Antique Road Extravaganza

Durham, NC – (September 9, 2016) – Are you a fan of PBS’s Antiques Roadshow? Ever wonder what your own heirlooms and keepsakes are worth? Come find out on Saturday, September 17th. Carillon Assisted Living of Durham is hosting an Antique Road Extravaganza that will directly benefit Keep Durham Beautiful beautification programs. Professional antique appraisers will be on site to evaluate your items and there will be old-time refreshments to enjoy while learning more about Keep Durham Beautiful programs.

Antique Road Extravaganza
Saturday, September 17, 2016
1:00 – 4:00 PM
4713 Garrett Road
$10 in advance/ $25 at the door

What to bring:
• Antiques and collectables
• Jewelry, silver, porcelain, glass
• Prints and artwork (some exclusions apply-call first)
• Small vintage furnishings
• Photos of large or heavy furniture (photos must be clear, recent, and taken from multiple angles)

What not to bring:
• Weapons of any kind
• Gold or gems
• Coins or coin collections
• Stamps or stamp collections
• Sports memorabilia

Advanced tickets are $10 per item to be evaluated and $25 at the door. Limit of two tickets per person. Advanced tickets are available through Carillon and Keep Durham Beautiful.

Tania Dautlick
Executive Director
Keep Durham Beautiful
2011 Fay Street
Durham, NC 27705
Phone: 919-354-2729
Email: tania@keepdurhambeautiful.org

For more information and questions regarding items that eligible for appraisal, call: 919-808-1007.

Please note that the last admittance for appraisals is 3:30pm and appraisals will be verbal, fair market evaluations only; no written appraisals for insurance or other purposes will be given.

About Keep Durham Beautiful
Keep Durham Beautiful is a nonprofit, volunteer organization working in partnership with the City of Durham General Services Department and Durham County to encourage residents, businesses, and community organizations to protect the environment and enhance the appearance of Durham through cleanup events, beautification projects, waste reduction, and educational activities. To learn more, visit the website, like on Facebook, and follow on Instagram, flickr, and Twitter.

Antique Road Extravaganza Flyer

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Join the Keep Durham Beautiful “Clean Your Block Party” in June

2016 “Clean Your Block Party,” Engages Volunteers to Take Action to Clean-up and Beautify Durham

June 12, 2016 – Keep Durham Beautiful invites residents to join with their neighbors as part of the nation’s largest annual Keep America Beautiful cleanup program, the “Clean Your Block Party,” to beautify Durham communities on June 18, 2016. Groups selecting other dates in June may also participate in the program.

Our goal is to end littering, improve recycling and beautify Durham, one block at a time. Whether a weedy corner, broken sign, littered street, or a garden bed needing attention, the “Clean Your Block Party” is an opportunity for neighbors, friends, and family to band together to create a positive, lasting impact, and to celebrate their accomplishments.

Registered “Clean Your Block Party” communities will be able to pick up available cleanup supplies from Keep Durham Beautiful on the afternoon of Thursday June 16, 2016 or by appointment. Supplies include litter grabbers, safety vests, trash bags, gloves, gardening tools, volunteer waivers, and a variety of prizes and goodies to show appreciation to our volunteers.

This initiative provides the best practices, activity ideas, and online toolkits for community cleanup organizers to learn about relevant Durham City and County ordinances and what they can do to address common maintenance issues in public spaces. Best practice tips are available for mosquito prevention, bird bath and rain barrel maintenance, standing water, tire disposal, recycling, paper shredding, bulky waste, the impact of cleanups to reduce pests, enforcement for unsightly areas, debris in the stormwater, and dog waste disposal.

Keep Durham Beautiful, along with other organizations in Keep America Beautiful’s national network of community-based affiliates, plan volunteer events and education programs that help to remove litter and renew parks and trails, clean waterways, reduce waste and improve recycling, and plant trees, flowers and community gardens.

In 2015, Keep Durham Beautiful volunteers:
• Participated in 120 events that engaged 3,230 individuals
• Contributed 7,693 volunteer hours valued at $23.07/hour
• Donated $177,478 worth of their time to make Durham more clean, green and beautiful
• Planted over 1,150 trees and distributed 800 tree seedlings to strengthen green infrastructure
• Collected and diverted 11,992 lbs recyclables and compostables from the landfill
• Removed 18,695 lbs litter from Durham parks, streams, bus stops and roads to create safer, cleaner communities

As part of this year’s community cleanup effort, we encourage residents to properly dispose of old tires and other items that may hold standing water to prevent mosquito breeding and the diseases they may carry. A special tire collection event is planned for July 9, 2016 at the City of Durham Solid Waste Transfer Station.

Keep Durham Beautiful seeks to educate and encourage volunteers to build a sense of community pride and environmental stewardship, offering experiences that help change behaviors to improve community appearance, block by block.

To get involved and register for “Clean Your Block Party,” please visit the website at: http://keepdurhambeautiful.org/our-events/cleanyourblockparty/ or contact us at: volunteer@keepdurhambeautiful.org or 919-560-4197 ext. 21244

About Keep Durham Beautiful
Keep Durham Beautiful is a nonprofit, volunteer organization working in partnership with the City of Durham General Services Department and Durham County to encourage residents, businesses, and community organizations to protect the environment and enhance the appearance of Durham through cleanup events, beautification projects, waste reduction, and educational activities. To learn more, visit the website, like on Facebook, and follow on Instagram, flickr, and Twitter.

About Keep America Beautiful
At Keep America Beautiful, we want to ensure that beauty is our lasting signature. A leading national nonprofit, Keep America Beautiful inspires and educates people to take action every day to improve and beautify their community environment. We envision a country where every community is a clean, green, and beautiful place to live. Established in 1953, Keep America Beautiful provides the expertise, programs and resources to help people end littering, improve recycling in America, and beautify America’s communities. The organization is driven by the work and passion of more than 600 community-based Keep America Beautiful affiliates, millions of volunteers, and the support of corporate partners, municipalities, elected officials, and individuals. To learn how you can donate or take action, visit kab.org.

Bee City, USA Press Release

From: Durham Bee City Committee

The Durham Bee City Committee is happy to announce the certification of Durham, NC as an official Bee City USA by the Durham City Council on June 6, 2016.  We will be celebrating this happy inauguration with the kick off of 2016 Pollinator Week. See community events below. (http://www.beecityusa.org)

Please send any questions to :

Joanne Andrews :joannetandrews@gmail.com

The Durham Bee City Committee is a volunteer group that promotes and facilitates the education, conservation and prosperity of our native and honeybee populations in and near Durham County. This group has been partnering with Keep Durham Beautiful

and other individuals, organizations and local businesses since 2015 in an endeavor to facilitate the official designation of Durham an official Bee City USA by our City Council.

The Durham Bee City Committee currently consists of:

Joanne Andrews, Mz. Polly Nator, 2015 Beaver Queen: http://beaverlodgelocal1504.org

Paula Alexander: Burt’s Bees : http://www.burtsbees.com/

Lee-Katherine Bonner and Justin Mannes: Bee Downtown: http://www.beedowntown.org

Lee Moore Crawford, lee attracting birds and bees: http://leeattractingbirds.blogspot.com

Diane Currier: Honeygirl Meadery:  http://honeygirlmeadery.com

Tania Daulick and Erin Victor: Keep Durham Beautiful: https://keepdurhambeautiful.org

Margaret Sands: Triangle Land Conservancy: https://www.triangleland.org

Cheralyn Schmidt: Durham County Agricultural Extension :

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Molly Strayer: NC Museum of Life and Science: http://www.lifeandscience.org/calendar

Matthew Yearout: The Durham County Bee Keepers: http://www.durhambeekeepers.org

Pollinator Week Activities in Durham 2016

Monday June 20th: 430-630pm : Pollinator Friendly Flowers and Plants with Lee Attracting Birds and Bees: Create Art and learn about creating bird and bee friendly urban habitats at The Makery.401 Geer St http://themakeryatmercury.com

Tuesday June 21st: 9:30-11:30am- Pollinator Week at the Museum of Life and Science: Join the Museum as we celebrate National Pollinator Week! Visit The Garden, our sustainable demonstration garden, and see real pollinators helping our plants to grow. With the help of our educators and local scientists, learn about the important role the animals play in the survival of plants and people alike. Free with museum admission.  Museum of Life and Science, 433 W Murray Ave. http://www.lifeandscience.org/calendar

Wednesday June 22nd:

9:30-11:30am- Pollinator Week at the Museum of Life and Science: Join the Museum as we celebrate National Pollinator Week! Visit The Garden, our sustainable demonstration garden, and see real pollinators helping our plants to grow. With the help of our educators and local scientists, learn about the important role the animals play in the survival of plants and people alike. Free with museum admission.  Museum of Life and Science, 433 W Murray Ave. http://www.lifeandscience.org/calendar

5:30-8pm-Wild Ideas for Birds and Bees, with the Triangle Land Conservancy

At The Frontier @The RTP

For Pollinator Week, the Triangle Land Conservancy is bringing together beekeepers, ecologists, naturalists and pollinator advocacy organizations to share wild ideas for the birds and bees. Enjoy pecha kucha style presentations from pollinator experts, sip some Honeygirl mead and local beer, visit with local beekeepers, and more. Free admission. Pre-registration suggested, Register and info

https://www.triangleland.org/event/wild-ideas-birds-bees?instance_id=105

Thursday June 23rd: 9:30-11:30am- Pollinator Week at the Museum of Life and Science: Join the Museum as we celebrate National Pollinator Week! Visit The Garden, our sustainable demonstration garden, and see real pollinators helping our plants to grow. With the help of our educators and local scientists, learn about the important role the animals play in the survival of plants and people alike. Free with museum admission.  Museum of Life and Science, 433 W Murray Ave. http://www.lifeandscience.org/calendar

Friday June 24th: 9:30-11:30am- Pollinator Week at the Museum of Life and Science: Join the Museum as we celebrate National Pollinator Week! Visit The Garden, our sustainable demonstration garden, and see real pollinators helping our plants to grow. With the help of our educators and local scientists, learn about the important role the animals play in the survival of plants and people alike. Free with museum admission.  Museum of Life and Science, 433 W Murray Ave. http://www.lifeandscience.org/calenda

Saturday June 25th:

10 AM-11:30 AM Get Wild! Bugs and Bees at Horton Grove Nature Preserve, join TLC as we hunt for bugs, bees, and other pollinators. We’ll search the grasslands, stream banks, and forest floors for an up close look at the many types of beetles, butterflies, ants, and millipedes which call Horton Grove Nature Preserve home. We will learn some of the important ways insects help our environment and talk about which insects are safe to hold and which should be observed from a distance. We’ll also talk about how the native grassland at Horton Grove supports pollinator insects. This program is perfect for anyone interested in insects and families with children ages 4 and up.

1-6pm, Pollinator Day Festival, Honeygirl Meadery in downtown Durham

Come celebrate all things pollinators: learn how to plant a pollinator garden, taste varieties of honey, see how mead is made from honey, sip some local mead (21 and over, $5), shop a pop-up pollinator flower shop, or head out for an expedition with the Durham Parks and Recreation’s Botany Bar Crawl from 2-4pm (pre-register and fee- http://www.dprplaymore.org/). At Honeygirl Meadery, free admission, 105 Hood Street, # 6 in downtown Durham. http://honeygirlmeadery.com

Durham as a Bee City:

Bee City USA certification is both an honor and a responsibility. Launched in 2012, the Bee City USA program endorses a set of commitments, defined in a resolution, for creating sustainable habitats for pollinators, which are vital to feeding the planet. Cities, towns and communities across America are invited to make these commitments and become certified as a Bee City USA affiliate.”

  • By being a Bee City USA community, city leaders can improve their city or town’s environment, eating habits, and economy.

Durham as a Bee City continued….

  • Help to ensure the survival of vital animal species crucial to our planet’s complex food web.
  • Raise community awareness of how our food grows and improve local food production through expanded pollination. More than 150 food crops in the United States depend on pollinators, including blueberries, apples, squash, strawberries and almonds.
  • Improve local plant nursery markets by increasing demand for native, pollinator friendly plants.
  • Raise community awareness of the dangers of non-native invasive plants to the local ecosystem.
  • Raise community awareness of the local environment’s seasonality as understanding grows about the pollinators’ reliance on blooming plants and trees.
  • By encouraging urban beekeeping, increase micro and small business opportunities. Newly discovered pride in local food products, such as artisanal honey and other honey bee products, creates new business opportunities. Honey is absolutely unique to the nearby flowers from which the bees gather nectar. Its taste and color vary dramatically as a result. Furthermore, as the community of beekeepers grows, the market for beekeeping supplies grows.

 

 

 

 

Durham to Celebrate Arbor Day March 6

Public Invited to Plant Trees After Ceremony

What: City of Durham 2016 Arbor Day Celebration with Community Tree Planting 

Who: City of Durham General Services Department Urban Forestry Division, Keep Durham BeautifulTrees Across Durham, and Durham City-County Sustainability Office

When: Sunday, March 6, 2016, from noon to 4 p.m.

Where: Museum of Life and Science (433 W. Murray Ave. Durham, N.C. 27704)

Fast Facts:

This annual celebration of Durham’s trees is free and open to the public. Activities are suitable for all ages and tools are provided for the volunteer tree planting. The schedule of activities includes:

o   Noon: Ceremonial presentation of the City’s Arbor Day proclamation and Tree City USA award

o   1 p.m.: Tree seedling giveaway and educational table displays, where attendees can choose from eight varieties of seedlings and receive guidance on tree selection, planting, and care.

o   1 p.m.: Arborist equipment demonstration as well as a “Meet a Scientist” lab demonstration.

o   2:30 p.m.: Community volunteer tree planting of 30 trees along North Glendale Avenue

Entry to the Museum of Life and Science is free to all Durham County residents on Sunday, March 6.  Showing proof of residence for each adult is required to receive free admission, and the limit is five children per adult resident. For additional information, or to volunteer for this community tree planting event, sign up online or email info@keepdurhambeautiful.org or call (919) 354-2729.

About the General Services Department

The City of Durham General Services Department creates, manages and maintains City properties to provide best value to the Durham community. The core business functions include: Administration/Business Services, Facilities Operations, Landscape Services, Urban Forestry, Real Estate, Project Management, Cemeteries, and Keep Durham Beautiful. As guided by the City’s Strategic Plan, General Services serves as a steward of the City’s physical and environmental assets. Through annual and long-range facility planning activities, the department plans, provides, and maintains the City’s facilities infrastructure, which supports the community’s quality of life and serves as a foundation of a healthy economy. 

About Keep Durham Beautiful

Keep Durham Beautiful is a nonprofit, volunteer organization working in partnership with the City of Durham General Services Department and Durham County to encourage residents, businesses, and community organizations to protect the environment and enhance the appearance of Durham through cleanup events, beautification projects, waste reduction, and educational activities. To learn more, visit the website, like on Facebook, and follow on Twitter and Instagram.

About Trees Across Durham

Trees Across Durham is a broad-based partnership dedicated to making Durham a healthier and greener community now and in the future through the planting and protection of trees; the education of tree caretakers and the general public about how to maintain healthy trees; and the measurement and communication of the benefits trees provide to the environment and community.

About the Durham City-County Sustainability Office

The mission of the Durham City/County Sustainability Office is to help protect and improve Durham’s environment through wise use of natural resources by providing guidance and resources to City and County employees, businesses, and residents. For more information, like on Facebook and follow on Twitter and Instagram.

Can I recycle this? Your Recycling FAQs answered

Recycling Tour - January 2016

Durham residents joined Keep Durham Beautiful and the City of Durham Solid Waste Management Department on a guided tour of the Sonoco Recycling plant in Raleigh.

Last month, Keep Durham Beautiful and the City of Durham Solid Waste Management Department partnered together to offer a free bus tour of the Sonoco recycling facility in Raleigh, NC.

The tour featured a trip to the City of Durham’s new transfer station, where our solid waste and recycling is consolidated into larger trucks then hauled either to the landfill or recycling plant, respectively. Following the life of our recycling from curbside to market, the tour made its way to the Sonoco Recycling Plant where our single stream recycling in Durham is sent after it is collected.  Sonoco is a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) that sorts and prepares recyclable materials to sell to manufacturing end-users. The manufacturing end-users turn our paper, plastics, and metals into new products, keeping these materials out of the landfill.

Interested residents took a guided tour through the state-of-the art facility and saw how a combination of manual and mechanical sorting allowed Sonoco to separate and bale the various materials (aluminum, steel, cardboard, mixed paper, and different types of plastics) with impressive accuracy. Afterwards, everyone was welcomed to ask both City of Durham Solid Waste Management and Sonoco representatives their burning recycling and waste reduction questions. Here are some of the answers to our most Frequently Asked Questions related to recycling in Durham:

Recycling FAQ’s:

Recycling Tour - MRF

Sonoco Recycling is a Material Recovery Facility (MRF) that sorts and prepares recyclable materials to sell to manufacturer end-users. Durham’s single-stream recyclables go to this recycling plant in Raleigh after collection.

Can I recycle phone books?

Yes. You can recycle your old (or new, but unwanted) phone books in the recycling bin. Want to opt-out of receiving phone books at altogether? Visit: https://www.yellowpagesoptout.com/

Can I recycle pizza boxes? What if they have some residual grease?

Yes. Pizza boxes are recyclable, even with some grease, but remove all trash and as much food residue as possible.

What should I do with plastic bags?

Plastic bags are not accepted in our single-steam recycling bins. They actually will shut down the machines at the MRF. You can recycle plastic bags and other film plastics (such as case wrap, produce bags, food storage bags, newspaper bags, and bubble wrap) at most local grocery stores. To find the nearest drop off location for film plastics, visit: http://bit.ly/1plMotU

How do I recycle my electronic waste?

Electronic waste can be taken to the quarterly E-Waste and Recycling Events hosted by the City of Durham. Don’t want to wait until the next event? Residents are invited to drop off e-waste at the City Transfer Station or County Convenience Sites. Triangle Ecycling and Kramden Institute will also accept computer equipment at no charge.

What should I do with confidential papers?

Confidential papers should be shredded and placed in a clear bag before recycling. You can shred and recycle confidential papers at the quarterly E-Waste and Paper Shredding Event. City residents can also bring up to 4 boxes of paper to shred to the transfer station (2115 E. Club Blvd) on Wednesdays by appointment (919-560-4505).

Which number plastics can be recycled?

You can recycle all plastics in your single-stream recycling bin except #6 (polystyrene) which is Styrofoam and plastic bags and other film plastics (see above question about recycling plastic bags).

To learn more about what is recyclable in Durham, please refer to the City and County’s websites:

Want to join us for the next recycling plant tour?

Keep Durham Beautiful and the City of Durham Solid Waste Management Department will be offering periodic tours to the recycling plant in Raleigh. If you are interested in joining us, please sign up for the monthly Keep Durham Beautiful newsletter featuring volunteer opportunities, bulb and tree seedling giveaways, community grant opportunities, recent KDB news, and information on events such as the recycling tour. You can register for our newsletter here: http://bit.ly/1Q0TfHs or email info@keepdurhambeautiful.org.

Erin Victor is an AmeriCorps Project GEOS Service Member working on environmental outreach and volunteer coordination with Keep Durham Beautiful.

Durham Hosts Tree Care 101 Workshop

What: Tree Care 101 Workshop

Who: Trees Across Durham

When: Saturday, January 23, 2016, from 9:30 a.m. to noon

Where: Northgate Park 300 W. Club Blvd. Durham, N.C. 27704

Fast Facts

  •  Trees Across Durham is hosting a free tree care workshop to provide volunteers with handson experience while planting and tending to the trees along the Ellerbe Creek Stream Restoration Project, which runs through Northgate Park.
  •  Participants will learn about tree planting, pruning, and other tree care topics. They will also discover the critical role played by trees and forests for stream health and water quality. Tools and gloves for the workshop will be provided, but participants are encouraged to bring their own if possible. Participants should also dress appropriately for the weather and bring water to drink.
  •  Workshop partners include Keep Durham Beautiful, City of Durham General Services Department Urban Forestry Division, Durham City-County Sustainability Office, City of Durham Public Works Department Stormwater & GIS Services Division, and the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality Division of Mitigation Services.
  •  For additional information or to register for this workshop, visit the Registration Web page or call (919) 560-7993.
  • Additional tree planting volunteer events are being held throughout January and February 2016. Information on all upcoming events is available on Greener Durham’s website.
  • Trees Across Durham is a broad-based partnership dedicated to making Durham a healthier and greener community now and in the future through the planting and protection of trees; the education of tree caretakers and the general public about how to maintain healthy trees; and the measurement and communication of the benefits trees provide to the environment and community.

Share! Register now for free #Durham Tree Care 101 Workshop on Jan. 23 http://tinyurl.com/TADevent

Rising litter Levels Threaten Durham’s Progress

Litter Index

Keep Durham Beautiful volunteers Butch Fisher, Rhonda Spivey, Michael Crutchfield, Rhonda Crutchfield and David Harris prepare to conduct the 2013 Community Appearance and Litter Index in a van provided by University Ford.

You may not have noticed, but Durham has a fair amount of litter. Our streets, schools, parks, and neighborhoods are filled with trash from cigarette butts to bottles, cans, plastic bags, and even items like car tires and shoes.

“First impressions are the lasting impressions,” said David Harris, a former Keep Durham Beautiful Board Member and long-time volunteer with the Durham Community Litter Index. “The appearance of the gateways into our city is what visitors see and develop first opinions about Durham.”
As Durhamites, we have a lot of pride. There is exciting energy here in the Bull City. Durham is teeming with talented local artists, authors, and the city is a nationally recognized foodie destination. But the phrase, “Keep it Dirty, Durham,” is not intended to be taken literally.
Litter hurts. Litter costs approximately $15 million in taxpayer dollars to clean up each year. Litter reduces tourism, hampers economic development, and encourages vandalism and crime. Litter contaminates our drinking water and is detrimental for plants and wildlife. Litter even causes accidents, with thousands of automobile accidents each year in the U.S. classified as litter-related.

So, what do we do about it?
On June 11th, Keep Durham Beautiful will be spearheading the 11th annual Litter Index and is looking for community members to get involved. Keep Durham Beautiful is a non-profit affiliate of Keep America Beautiful that works in collaboration with the City of Durham and Durham County to engage and inspire individuals to take greater responsibility for their community environment. Keep Durham Beautiful, with the help of dedicated volunteers, has collected data annually on litter levels in the city since 2005.

What is the Litter Index?
Developed by Keep America Beautiful, the Litter Index is a quantitative measure used across the nation to gauge roadside litter levels. Routes throughout the city are scored on a scale from one to four, with a score of one indicating “no litter” and a score of four indicating the area is “extremely littered.” The index is used to determine the effectiveness of litter campaigns and identify litter “hot spots” in the community for future clean ups.
Teams of volunteers receive training before driving along pre-determined routes to monitor the amount of litter along the roads. “Each route includes business/commercial districts and residential communities and consists of urban, suburban, rural and county roads,” said David Harris, who has participated in the Litter Index for the past 10 years, taking on various roles as an evaluator, driver, coordinator, trainer, co-chair, and chair.

Results from the 2014 index indicate that roadside litter has increased in Durham. The average score across all the routes in 2014 was 1.804, up from a score of 1.35 in 2013. These results suggest the need to take action now. Litter is an individual behavior and each of us can do our part to make a difference. From joining a neighborhood cleanup, adopting a street or bus stop, or by modeling good behavior in your home, school, work or neighborhood YOU have the ability to reduce litter and increase litter literacy in this city we love.

If you are interested in joining this year’s Litter Index efforts, please contact info@keepdurhambeautiful.org or register here. The Litter Index will take place on Thursday, June 11th from 8:30 am – 1 pm at the Forest Hills Neighborhood Clubhouse. Coffee, bagels, and gratitude will be provided for all volunteers.

 

E-Waste, Paper Shredding and Christmas Tree Recycling Event Rescheduled to Saturday February 2

Due to the predicted inclement weather later today, tomorrow’s E-Waste, Paper Shredding and Christmas Tree Recycling Event has been canceled. The event has been rescheduled for Saturday, February 2, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Durham County Memorial Stadium, located at 750 Stadium Dr.

Next Saturday’s event, co-sponsored by the City of Durham’s Solid Waste Management Department, Sonoco Recycling, Shimar Recycling, Synergy Recycling and Durham County Government, will accept nearly all electronic devices with a cord, including:

  • Computers, laptops, keyboards, mice, printers, monitors, speakers, copiers, scanners, circuit boards, hard drives, computer parts, etc.
  • Televisions, stereo equipment, tape players, receivers, amplifiers, record players, etc.
  • Kitchen electronics, such as microwaves, mixers, blenders, choppers, etc.
  • Telephones, cell phones, and fax machines
  • Hair dryers, curling irons, alarm clocks and vacuum cleaner
  • Power tools, cordless tools, etc.
  • Electronic toys, such as keyboards and video game systems
  • This event will not accept large appliances, refrigerators, air conditioners, or any other appliances that contain Freon.

Confidential paper shredding will also be provided on site. Requirements for shredding include:

  • Paper may contain paper clips and staples; however, hanging file folders will not be accepted.
  • Only paper should be brought for shredding. CDs, DVDs, and other non-paper items will not be accepted.
  • All paper should be loose and not in binders or other binding items made of non-paper.
  • Residents may be present to observe their confidential document shredding if the amount to be shredded can fit into one 96-gallon roll cart (approximately 240 pounds of material or approximately eight small, banker boxes of material).
  • Participants with larger quantities will have items placed in boxes to be shredded off-site at Shimar Recycling’s secure facility.

Christmas trees will also be accepted at this event. Trees taller than six feet should be cut in half and not placed in bags. Residents should also remove all decorations and hardware, including tinsel, lights, garland, ornaments, nails, and stands.

Durham residents who can’t make this event can still safely and conveniently recycle their old electronics at the City’s Waste Disposal and Recycling Center (Transfer Station), located at 2115 E. Club Blvd. The facility is open Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. to noon.

For information about items accepted at this event or the City’s recycling facilities, contact Durham One Call at (919) 560-1200 or visit http://DurhamNC.gov/ich/op/swmd/Pages/wr_transfer.aspx.